All posts by meetmontgomery

Madeline Burkhardt



Madeline Burkhardt received her Master of Arts from Johns Hopkins University in Museum Studies. She is currently employed as the Adult Education Coordinator at the Rosa Parks Museum at Troy University – Montgomery. Madeline has an interest in engaging the public with their local art community as well as historic preservation.

Join us as we discuss upcoming events, art exhibitions and fun stuff to do in Montgomery. This is a great episode!


Lance Brown



Lance Brown, immediate past president of the Montgomery Rotary Club, discusses how the Rotary Club helped him connect and grow in Montgomery, Alabama. The Rotary organization provides service to others, promotes integrity, and advances world understanding, goodwill, and peace through fellowship of business, professional, and community leaders.

 


Andrew Szymanski



With every great person, there’s a great story. Learn more about Andrew Szymanski and the Montgomery Dragonboat Races here! Andrew grew up in the small Northeastern town of Topsfield, Massachusetts. After high school, he moved south to Athens, GA to attend the University of Georgia, where he received a degree in Communications. Upon graduation, he decided to pursue his interest in nonprofits by serving in the AmeriCorps VISTA program, placing him in Montgomery, AL. Andrew served as program director for Bridge Builders Alabama, an organization that develops leadership skills and civic engagement practices in high school students. During his year of service, he quickly realized that the biggest impediment to nonprofits doing great work was access to funding and the development of strategic partnerships with local businesses and government entities.

Andrew’s introduction to dragon boating came early in 2010, through a conversation with non-profit acquaintances who had heard of an event in Chattanooga. It was new and exciting, and he determined it would be a unique fundraising tool for local Montgomery nonprofit agencies. The Montgomery Dragon Boat Festival was incorporated in 2010 and since then Andrew has served as its Executive Director. From its inaugural year, it has grown to be one of Montgomery’s largest events with an annual attendance of over 10,000 people and participation of 60-70 teams. Over the past 8 years he has overseen the distribution of over $250,000 in grant money to his organization’s beneficiaries.

In 2012 Andrew joined the Southeast Regional Dragon Boat Association as a state representative for Alabama. Two years later he was elected President and began to expand the reach of the sport in the Southern US. He also had the opportunity to serve on the United States Dragon Boat Federation Board of Directors for 3 years and in 2017 was elected President of the USDBF. The USDBF is the governing body for competitive dragon boating in the United States and in October of 2017 he took 240 Team USA athletes to the Dragon Boat World Championships in Kunming, China. The United States finished 3rd in the Nations Cup in 2017 and they are excited about bringing an even stronger team to the next World Championships in Pattaya, Thailand in 2019.

Andrew is the owner of two amazing dogs, Mr. Smudge and Miss Maple. He loves visiting his parent’s vacation home on Mount Desert Island off the Northern Coast of Maine and eating as much seafood he possibly can each fall. In 2017 Andrew bought his first home in the historic Cloverdale Idlewild neighborhood and looks forward too many more years in Alabama’s capital city.

To register for the Dragon Boat race, follow this link: https://montgomerydragonboat.org/


Jordan Kirkland



Jordan Kirkland is a 31-year-old Montgomery native who returned to his hometown in 2015. After graduating from St. James School in 2005, Jordan went on to obtain a BA in Public Administration from Auburn University in 2009. While pursuing a full-time sales role with Capitol Container, Jordan also hopes to make a lasting impact on the local music scene through his passion project, Live & Listen.


Clay McInnis



What a great way to kick off the Spring Podcast series! Join us as Clay McInnis talks about our beloved Montgomery; past, present and future! We are on the cusp of greatness.

Clay was born and raised in Montgomery and was the first at Auburn to graduate in Sustainable Entrepreneurship. Today he owns Commerce Consulting, a company that manages small political and trade associations. He also is a commercial real estate agent and real estate investor and developer. He is married to Melissa, a former WSFA reporter and they have one son, Anderson.


Elizabeth Williams



Elizabeth was born and raised in Montgomery, Alabama. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication and Information Sciences from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, AL. She has a total of 14 years of experience in communications, marketing and public relations. As a young professional, she is a member of Emerge Montgomery, Torchbearers Class III and serves on the Girls on the Run Executive Board. She also has an active role on several planning committees for numerous programs and events. Elizabeth devotes time outside of work to numerous nonprofit organizations including Boy Scouts of America (Exploring), March of Dimes, American Cancer Society, Muscular Dystrophy Association, Arthritis Foundation, American Heart Association and Alabama Kidney Foundation. Elizabeth is a member of True Divine Baptist Church where she serves with the greeting ministry, girls ministry and health ministry. She is currently the Community Events Manager for Baptist Health where she has worked since July 2006.


Mia Mothershed



Difference maker this week is Mia Mothershed of Jackson Hospital! Mia is the marketing and public relations director and is committed to a healthy river region. On Saturday, February 24th, Jackson Hospital is holding their annual heart health screening. It starts at 8am and ends at 11am. To register for this event (for all ages) www.jackson.org/events

Mia is active in the community and volunteers her time with several organizations including the Junior League, Leadership Montgomery and currently serves as ambassador chairman for the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce.


Charles Lee



Presenting Difference maker and Community hero, Charles Lee! The 12-month Community Heroes project spotlights people making a difference in Montgomery each month. The presenting sponsor is Beasley Allen Law Firm, monthly sponsors are the City of Montgomery, Keith Roll, Realtor-Wallace and Moody, and the Montgomery Regional Airport. We will have each winner on our podcast so stay tuned!

Check out the full story here:

http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/story/news/2018/01/19/thats-my-dog-owner-want-more-than-just-talk-community-hero/1016500001/

Charles Lee wasn’t supposed to live past age 5.

Born prematurely and diagnosed with bronchitis and Hepatitis C at birth, odds were not in his favor. A “crack baby,” Lee spent the first two years of his life in a Chicago hospital before he was deemed strong enough to go home.

But before fast forwarding to the smell of hot dogs at his West Jeff Davis Avenue restaurant, That’s My Dog, first understand that Lee learned to cook crack long before he learned to cook for his successful business. And long before he opened an after-school youth ministry on Upper Wetumpka Road.

Lee was only 11 years old and still in Chicago when he held metal spoons over high heat. A year later, he witnessed a best friend shot twice in the head while robbing a store.

And at 13, he was shot in the chest during an altercation that occurred in retaliation for another friend being injured in a shooting. Then there was a Florida prison where he spent time for selling drugs.

“From everything I’ve experienced, it really boiled down to God trusting me with all of my experiences and helping others,” he said.

Lee, 35, doesn’t just walk into Montgomery neighborhoods today to save lives through serving meat inside a bun or through mentoring.

He walks in to change them and to provide experience and opportunity where some may never get it.

And for that, Lee is the Montgomery Advertiser’s January Community Hero, a recognition offered to someone who often works behind the scenes, and who brings value to our Capital City, and who has a story to tell and lessons to share.

That’s My Dog

Lee does not operate behind the scenes.

He is front and center cooking hot dogs and Conecuh sausage, and grilling sauerkraut, bacon and toppings for specialties like That’s My Gump Dog, That’s My Downtown Dog and That’s My Junkyard Dog.

More: ‘Community Heroes Montgomery’ to highlight those who make a difference

During a quick break, he sat at one of his restaurant’s tables and talked about the time he spent in prison for selling drugs and how that time made him grateful for past experiences shaping him into who he is today.

Lee talked about for what he wants to do, which is guide children to opportunities in education and the arts.

His work at That’s My Dog has provided him the means, flexibility and self-sufficiency. And the schedule provides him the opportunity to work with the city’s youth through That’s My Child, which provides recreational activities for area youth after school.

“If I wouldn’t have been to jail, I probably would have died,” Lee said. “I think that’s where I heard God’s voice the most. That’s where I figured out who I was. Who are you? Why are you alive?

“And he was like, ‘Hey, remember all those hot dog carts you saw in Chicago? Do you see any around here?’”

Lee and his mother moved to Montgomery when he was 14 years old.

He sat at That’s My Dog and remembered this part of his story, greeting customers as they walked in. And as he walked out with them to continue conversations, giving fist bumps to some, he also made sure to check on customers.

That’s My Dog started as a cart on Dexter Avenue in 2012 — it’s still there — and expanded to the building on West Jeff Davis two years later. In about six months, Lee hopes to have a third location open at That’s My Child. It will be operated by teens for teens — to give them work experience and to provide opportunity.

The purpose of Lee’s mission is simple: “It’s just to let any average Joe from the hood know that your dreams can still come true, no matter how you start it off,” he said.

“No matter how you begin, your end can still turn out fabulous. It really depends on you making the right decisions. And it starts there.”

That’s My Child

It was a Wednesday about 4:30 p.m., and two children sat at computers while another was tutored in math at That’s My Child, a turn-key, gated facility that includes multiple buildings, three vans and two school buses.

Several children who finished schoolwork on this day dribbled a basketball on a one-net court outside. The hoop with torn netting serves as training for the boys who are part of a basketball team.

The ministry here reaches students from Lee High School, Capitol Heights and Goodwyn middle schools, and Highland Gardens and Chisholm elementary schools.

While the first hour of the after-school program was focused on tutoring, which Lee wants to expand, more than 45 youth came in for the extracurricular activities after the first hour.

“We’re still trying to figure it all out,” Lee said of the program. “The vision … it’s really going to change the city. We want to do a television show, where they get to talk about issues that they are facing at home and school.

“It gives me a purpose for living as well. I could just be working here and living life.”

Instead, he has seen five students go to college, sometimes accompanying them as they move onto campus “because they don’t have anyone else.” One has enlisted in the military, and others are working full time.

“In our neighborhood, they say it’s one in every five kids that will graduate high school in Chisholm,” he said. “I know it’s not my job to save everybody. If one of these guys go to college … they can change the world.

“Success is one kid at a time.”

That’s his life

Lee attended McIntyre Middle School and Houston Hill Junior High School, but left both schools because of fights. He ended up making strides at Project Upward School, but after attempting to finish high school at Robert E. Lee High School, he was told his credits wouldn’t transfer, he said.

He dropped out of school and worked at Burger King and Church’s Chicken. And that’s where life went up, and then down again.

He joined the Job Corps, where he met his wife, Mohona, and received his GED and a certificate in culinary arts.

But then old habits re-entered Lee’s life. As he and his wife survived by sleeping on clothes and under jackets, they moved to Florida when Lee was 19 years old.

And Lee began selling drugs on a large scale.

And that sent him to prison, which is when the change within him happened that led him back to Montgomery after his release.

“I want to be more than just talk,” Lee said. “I want to be able to say I’ve done all of that bad stuff, but now I own a business and I’m in your life. That’s the beauty of not being able to just talk about it, but being able to walk the walk, and them being able to see the journey.”

He said when the youth come into his path, he sees it as his responsibility to be an example of who Christ is to him.

“You’re trying to make such a change, but you don’t really see that as far as crime rate,” he said. “You just still see murders going on every night, and still people burglarizing houses. You begin to think, ‘Are you really making changes in your city or neighborhood?’

“It’s our job to make sure we introduce them to Christ. Instead of me trying to make sure I get results. God told me, ‘It’s not your job to change their lives. It’s your job to introduce them to me, and let me change their lives.'”

Location, information, contact

That’s My Dog is located at 232 West Jeff Davis Avenue. Online: That’s My Dog Montgomery on Facebook. Call: 334-356-3040

That’s My Child is located at 2414 Lower Wetumpka Road. Online: www.thatsmychildmgm.org. Call: 334-239-7434

Community Heroes Montgomery

The 12-month Community Heroes Montgomery, sponsored by Beasley Allen Law Firm, starts today and will profile one person every month this year. 

Every monthly winner will receive a $500 travel voucher from the Montgomery Regional Airport and American Airlines, a staycation from Wind Creek, dinner at Itta Bena restaurant and a certificate of appreciation from Montgomery Mayor Todd Strange.

At the end of the 12 months, the Heroes will be recognized at a banquet, and a “Hero of 2018” will be honored.

The 12 categories the Montgomery Advertiser will focus on: educator, health, business leader, military, youth, law enforcement, fire/EMT, nonprofit/community service, religious leader, senior volunteer, entertainment (arts/music) and athletics (such as a coach).

Do you know a Community Hero?

To nominate someone for Community Heroes Montgomery, email communityheroes@gannett.com. Please specify which category you are nominating for and your contact information.


Mike Murphy



Our difference maker this week is Mike Murphy! He is the VP of Corporate and Fan Engagement at the Montgomery Biscuits! He joins the Meet Montgomery Podcast to discuss his move from Richmond to Montgomery and how 2018 will be the best Biscuits season yet!


Chandalyn Chrzanowski



Our Difference maker this week is Chandalyn Chrzanowski of Montgomery Area Nontraditional Equestrians or M.A.N.E.; MANE is a non-profit organization formed in 1994 that provides safe and effective therapeutic horseback riding opportunities to Montgomery and tri-county area children and adults with emotional, physical, cognitive, and developmental disabilities. MANE holds 501(C)3 corporation status, is a fully accredited Premier Riding Center
through the Professional Association for Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.), and all instructors are certified by PATH Intl. PATH Intl. is a regulatory agency that assures stringent standards for quality therapeutic horseback riding through instructor certification, site accreditation, and program monitoring.

Therapeutic horseback riding provides extremely important and effective intervention for people with cognitive, emotional, and/or physical disabilities. A rider straddling a horse stretches tight or spastic muscles throughout his or her body. Instructors and therapists use the three-dimensional rhythmic motion of the horse to reduce spasticity and abnormal movements, quicken reflexes, aid in motor planning, and strengthen muscles, joints, and tendons damaged by trauma or illness in their disabled patients. Riders with physical impairments or limited mobility can experience increased balance and muscle control; a wider range of motion; and improved respiration, circulation, appetite, and digestion. Confidence and enhanced self-esteem are positive by-products of therapeutic riding.

MANE’s new 44 acre site is located at 3699 Wallahatchie Road in East Montgomery, and includes an outdoor riding ring, office, 15 stall barn with indoor riding area, and a 3 acre state-of-the-art sensory integration trail. MANE serves around 100 individuals weekly. Call 334-213-0909 today to get your rider registered for one of our 3 ten-week sessions or our children’s summer camp which are held each year.

Chandalyn has grown up with horses interacting with them at her mother’s barn. She began riding hunter seat and developed equine skills from not only her mom, but also from various trainers and instructors. She has worked and volunteered at many riding programs, both therapeutic riding and show barns. Chandalyn competed on the IHSA team at both Wesleyan College and St. Andrews University, where she graduated with BA degree in Therapeutic Horsemanship and obtained Registered PATH instructor certification. While at St. Andrews, she spent her time riding on the equestrian team and working with the therapeutic program there. After graduating, she went to work at a show barn with noted equine trainer Shep Welles and assisted in managing the barn. This allowed Chandalyn to work with many different kinds of horses, taking a variety of lessons, as well as showing and teaching lessons. She joined MANE in April of 2014 instantly becoming part of the MANE team by charming staff, riders, and the Board with her personality and passion. Since working at MANE, Chandalyn’s passion for the industry has driven her to acquire her Advance Instructor Certification.

For more info please go to maneweb.org